Month: November 2016

Learning Digital Skills in a Time-Limited Program

The Learning Digital Skills in a Time-limited Program brief examines an approach to providing digital literacy acquisition support to learners who entered a cohort group that met together on a regular schedule, but worked at their own pace through the available content over the course of a fixed time frame. The key discoveries that follow summarize one partner’s time-limited program design; however, time-limited approaches were explored by other partners as well. This brief details how one program struck a balance between meeting the needs of learners and maximizing limited program resources.

Let us know what you think in the comments section. What is your experience of working within time-limited or cohort programs? How might the findings we set forth in this brief help you continue thinking about ways to serve your population of learners?

Learning Digital Skills in a Corrections Setting

The Learning Digital Skills in a Corrections Setting Brief describes the mentoring and learning model as applied in the Orleans Parish Prison Reentry Program. The brief also discusses the unique value of this program in a reentry setting. Also included is information about the logistics of ensuring Internet security and compliance to law prohibiting inmate access to the internet.

More detailed information about the corrections program is provided in the Corrections and Reentry Case Study.

Let us know what you think in the comments section. What have you experienced in the area of helping learners within corrections settings acquire digital literacy skills? How might the findings we set forth in this brief help you continue thinking about ways to serve your population of learners?

Another Call for Guest Bloggers

We hope you’ve been finding our posts informative and helpful in your work with adult digital literacy learners.  But we want to hear from you!  Please let us know if you would like to be a guest blogger.  We would love to hear about your experiences in the field, your thoughts about our research, research you’ve been conducting, or any other ideas about adults and digital literacy acquisition. Send us your idea and contact information and we’ll work out the details.

Corrections and Reentry Case Study

The Corrections and Reentry  case study investigates the digital literacy acquisition process for learners within a corrections setting. The digital literacy program was part of the reentry program available to some individuals approaching their release date. The case study describes the lab within a prison, and details of how mentor-facilitated, self-paced learning was organized. Examination of the learner path in a corrections setting highlights how learners perceived the relevance of digital literacy in their lives; how they overcame their fears of computers or technology and their self-confidence grew; and potential changes in their self-identity, which often led to imagining new and different possible futures. Implications for these findings include how correctional education and reentry programs can improve post-release employment rates and reduce recidivism by offering incarcerated individuals strength-based skills development training that aim to empower these individuals, foster confidence, capability, and hope for the future.

Let us know what you think in the comments section. What is your experience working with individuals in corrections settings and what challenges have you faced? What do you think is a realistic approach to preparing people for reentry into a digital world?  How might the findings we set forth in this case study help you continue thinking about ways to serve your population of learners?

Learners: Measuring Success

One of the things adult educators must be concerned about is measuring how successfully the learners are mastering a set of skills and content.  Traditionally, these are measured through standardized assessments such as TABE or the GED.  Other measures of success used in the adult education field can be employment rates.  However, our work with adult learners acquiring digital literacy skills led us to consider new ways of measuring success. The Measuring Success Brief summarizes findings that demonstrate the need for incremental, learner-centered evaluations of success in digital literacy acquisition programs.

Let us know what you think in the comments section. What have you experienced in the area of measuring success? How might the findings we set forth in this brief help you continue thinking about ways to serve your population of learners?