Month: August 2016

Community Connections Policy Brief

The Community Connections policy brief describes how the digital literacy acquisition program in a rural community was sustained through formal and informal connections across a variety of organizations and community institutions. The case study describes the setting, the details of how tutor facilitated, self-paced learning was organized, and the various ways connections were made across organizations. Five types of connections are identified: formal top-level partnerships, local connections, library/workforce partnership, school/workforce connections, informal community connections, and lab coordinator/tutor/learner connections. Implications for these findings include how policymakers and other key stakeholders may benefit from recognizing and building on the ways people in the field marshal formal and informal resources to create and sustain vibrant programs.

Let us know what you think in the comments section. What have you experienced in the area of working within a community to make your program successful? How might the findings we set forth in this policy brief help you continue thinking about ways to serve your population of learners?

Language Learners: The Role of Online Materials

In the digital literacy acquisition project, learners were supported by in-person tutors along with online materials that they could move through at their own pace.  The Role of Online Materials brief describes how English language learners interacted with the online learning materials and resources.

Let us know what you think in the comments section. What have you experienced in the area of supporting language learners as they acquire digital literacy skills? How might the findings we set forth in this brief help you continue thinking about ways to serve your population of learners?

The Learner Path

The research indicated that participants share a common learner path as they begin acquiring digital literacy. They go through a period of goal setting and discovery. Once they begin working with a tutor, successful learners tend to experience pivotal moments that set them up for success. The learners complete their journey with a growing set of skills and a new sense of independence that includes the confidence to explore on their own, the willingness to experiment as a way to learn, and expanding their knowledge of where to turn to for help when needed. Along the way, learners discover new challenges and opportunities in the digital world. How these moments unfold, however, varies according to the needs of the learner and the context within which they are learning.The Learner Path brief describes the steps learners took as they acquired digital literacy, including key moments of transition.

Let us know what you think in the comments section. What process have you seen learners move through as they acquire digital literacy skills? How might the findings we set forth in this brief help you continue thinking about ways to serve your population of learners?

 

Language Learners: The Learner/Tutor Relationship

The Learner/Tutor Relationship brief describes findings that show how tutors who are bilingual are preferred by English language learners, even when they do not speak the learner’s first language. The unique ways that tutors and learners work together in digital literacy acquisition program are featured.

Let us know what you think in the comments section. What have you experienced in the area of helping tutors support language learners as they acquire digital literacy skills? How might the findings we set forth in this brief help you continue thinking about ways to serve your population of learners?

Volunteering in a Digital Literacy Program

Tutors stayed with the program for a number of reasons, but achieving a level of personal satisfaction was vitally important.The Volunteering in a Digital Literacy Program Brief describes findings that detail the personal reasons and programmatic qualities that engaged and motivated tutors bring to a tutor facilitated digital literacy acquisition program.

Information about learners who became tutors also is available.

Let us know what you think in the comments section. What have you experienced in the area of developing your volunteer tutors? How might the findings we set forth in this brief help you continue thinking about ways to serve your population of learners?